Our Teaching Staff

Listed below are all the courses available for undergraduate study within psychology. Provided under each course listed is a brief description of the content covered and the names of the teaching staff who instruct the course.

Further information about each of these courses can be found under our Course Outlines.

Our Program Guides may also be used in conjunction with these course outlines to determine how your study will progress, depending on the undergraduate degree you have chosen.

Core Courses

STAGE 1

PSYC 1001 Psychology 1A

This course introduces the content and methods of psychology as a basic science, with emphasis on the social bases of behaviour. After an initial review of the historical foundations for the scientific study of human behaviour, we discuss several specific topics related to the social aspects of human behaviour. Specific topics covered in this course include development, theories of personality, theories of consciousness and social influences on behaviour. In addition, the course provides training in the methods of psychological inquiry and in the critical evaluation of research.

Lecturers in this Course
Dr Tom Beesley
Prof Richard Bryant 
Prof Simon Killcross 
Dr Jenny Richmond 
Prof Joe Forgas 
Dr Lisa Williams 
Dr Joel Pearson 
Prof Eddie Harmon-Jones 
A/Prof Tom Denson 
A/Prof Lenny Vartanian 
Dr Kate Faasse 
A/Prof Jacky Cranney

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1001.html

PSYC 1011 Psychology 1B

This course introduces the content and methods of psychology as a basic science, with emphasis on the biological bases of behaviour. Specific topics covered in this course include perception, memory and cognition, animal learning, psychobiology and abnormal psychology. After describing the basic phenomena within an area, the goal will be to explore the neural bases of these behaviours.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Tom Beesley
A/Prof Thomas Whitford
Prof Rick Richardson
Dr Denovan Begg
Dr Oren Griffiths
Dr Damien Mannion

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1011.html

PSYC 1111 Measuring Mind & Behaviour

This course provides students with knowledge of the characteristics of the scientific approach in general and experimental methodology, design and data analysis in psychology. It provides a comprehensive foundation in critical thinking, enabling students to design and plan research, conduct basic statistical analysis, scrutinise and critically evaluate published research, discriminate between evidence-based information and pseudoscience and effectively communicate statistical and research data in variety of formats and contexts. 

Lecturers in this Course

Kathryn Hutton-Bedbrook
Lidija Krebs-Lazendic

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1111.html

PSYC 1021 Introduction to Psychological Applications (B Psych Students Only)

This course offers an introduction to psychology as a scientific discipline and as a profession, with special emphasis on initiating the academic and professional development of students in the Bachelor of Psychology programme. The content of this course is structured around the graduate attributes associated with the scientist-practitioner model, the basis for the training of psychologists in Australia and internationally. This course also provides a first step in your development of psychological literacy, that is, the capacity to utilise your psychological knowledge, skills and attitudes in to achieve personal, professional, and societal goals.

Lecturers in this Course

A/Prof Jacquelyn Cranney
Dr Sue Morris
Prof Richard Kemp
Dr Michael Young
Eva Chan
Kelvin Wong
Dr Annette Olschewski

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1021.html

STAGE 2

PSYC 2001 Research Methods 2

This course prepares students for higher-level psychology courses by conveying the benefits and limitations of particular research designs and inferential statistical analyses. It also provides specific skills in carrying out data analyses, communicating the outcomes and drawing appropriate conclusions. Students who continue in psychology can study more advanced techniques in PSYC3001 Research Methods 3, which provides preparation for the independent research project carried out in the fourth (Honours) year.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof Peter Lovibond
Dr Chris Donkin

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC2001.html

PSYC 2061 Social and Developmental Psychology

This course introduces students to empirical research and theories in social and developmental psychology. These are two critical areas of psychological inquiry that directly deal with issues concerning the development of human capabilities, and the way humans interact with, and are influenced by each other. The course contains two components, Developmental and Social Psychology. These two components run consecutively. During the first half of the session, you will learn about issues relating to the development of psychological processes that are important to the cognitive, emotional and social aspects of people’s lives. In the second half of the course, the social psychology of interpersonal behaviour is covered.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Jenny Richmond
Prof Brett Hayes
Prof Joe Forgas
A/Prof Jacquelyn Cranney

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC2061.html

PSYC 2071 Perception and Cognition

This course introduces students to those areas of Psychology that are more closely concerned with “the mind”. These are Perception and Cognition. Perception is concerned with the processes and mechanisms that allow us to respond to our immediate environment, and to know its properties. These range from how far things are away from us and each other, to the trajectory of a ball in a game of cricket, to a facial expression. We shall consider a range of issues in this section of the course including the reasons for illusions, perceptual organisation and the way in which we learn to perceive.

The cognition part of the course introduces students to theories and methods of investigating the fundamental cognitive processes that underlie attention, memory and thought. Cognitive psychologists study a range of phenomena that include such diverse topics as the factors that influence efficient memory storage and retrieval; the variables that contribute to “information overload”; and the methods people use to solve problems and make decisions. Understanding the perceptual and cognitive processes that underlie human behaviour has a number of important benefits. The complementary approaches of cognitive psychologists and computer scientists to understanding mental processes, and their interactions with other disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience, that are also concerned with understanding the mind, have led to the development of the discipline known as “cognitive science”.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Damien Mannion
A/Prof Branka Spehar
A/Prof Dan Navarro
Prof Marcus Taft

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC2071.html

PSYC 2081 Learning and Physiological Psychology

This course focuses on the behavioural and physiological basis of elementary learning processes. These include learning about relations between events (Pavlovian conditioning), learning about relations between one’s behaviour and events (Instrumental conditioning), how these forms of learning control behaviours and their involvement in addiction, attachment and schizophrenia. The course emphasises psychological explanations of behaviour but also seeks to ground these processes in neurobiology.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof Fred Westbrook
A/Prof Mike Le Pelley
Prof Gavin McNally
Dr Vincent Laurent

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC2081.html

PSYC 2101 Assessment Personality Psychopathology

This course deals with psychological assessment, personality and psychopathology. The assessment portion of the course will include key concepts in personality and intelligence testing. The psychopathology portion of the course is an introduction to the study of maladaptive behaviour and mental disorders. The course will provide an overview of common mental disorders, including anxiety, mood, eating, childhood, and psychotic disorders. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic criteria, contemporary theories of psychopathology, and empirically supported approaches to treating mental disorders.

Lecturers in this Course

A/Prof Eva Kimonis
A/Prof Jessica Grisham
A/Prof Thomas Whitford
Dr Lisa Williams
A/Prof Lenny Vartanian
Dr Angela Nickerson

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC2101.html

STAGE 3

PSYC 3001 Research Methods 3

This course builds upon the data analytic methods and concepts developed in PSYC2001 and is concerned with data analytic methods that allow for confident inference on generalised
comparisons between means (contrasts) for between-subjects designs with more than two groups, and within-subjects designs with two or more occasions of measurement. 

The aims of the course are to provide students with a level of understanding of analysis of variance models and procedures which will allow them to choose data analysis strategies for a range of experimental designs and to critically evaluate data analyses of published experiments. The course aims to equip students with the skills necessary to carry out these analyses using statistical packages such as SPSS and PSY, and to interpret analysis outcomes.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Melanie Gleitzman

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3001.html

PSYC 3011 Research Applications of Psychology

The primary purpose of this course is to provide a capstone experience for students undertaking a major in psychology, regardless of their degree program. Psychology graduate attributes should lead to the development of psychological literacy, which is useful for any career destination that involves interacting with other human beings (https://student.unsw.edu.au/psychological-literacy). For example, the kind of skills you should learn in this course, such as reflecting on your personal and professional knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs), are critical to professional development in any field (and should be compulsory for all health professions).

Lecturers in this Course

A/Prof Jacquelyn Cranney
Dr Sue Morris
Dr Peter Baldwin
Eva Chan
A/Prof Tom Denson
Mahreen Khan
Prof Jim Kehoe
Leigh Mellish
Prof Ben Newell
A/Prof Branka Spehar

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3011.html

 

Elective Courses

FIRST YEAR ELECTIVES:

PSYC1022 Psychology of Addiction

This course deals with transdisciplinary issues pertinent to the understanding and treatment of drug addiction. Topics include:

  • historic origins of drugs; 
  • manufacture, global distribution and black market economics; 
  • epidemiology of population uptake; 
  • biomedical harms; 
  • neuropharmacological actions; 
  • effects on learning, motivation, cognition and behaviour; 
  • psychiatric comorbidity; 
  • individual differences in vulnerability; 
  • brain mechanisms of reward and impaired cognitive control; 
  • associative learning and addiction
  • treatment by behavioural interventions and pharmacotherapy; 
  • prevention by education; 
  • prohibition by criminal justice; and 
  • the role of scientific evidence in government policy.

The course provides a broad basic understanding of drug use and the systems in place to counteract it.

Lecturers in this Course:

Helena Pacitti
Dr. Lee Hogarth
Dr. Marios Panayi

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1022.html

PSYC1023 Abnormal Psychology

This course provides a contemporary view of issues associated with human mental disorders and psychopathology. It will introduce and discuss the notion of abnormality in behaviour, diagnostic practice, stigma, prognosis and treatment in human mental disorders. There will be discussion of what is known of the nature and aetiology of major mental disorders such as schizophrenia, anxiety and depression, psychological and biological theories that attempt to account for these disorders, as well as their prevalence, treatment and prognosis.

Lecturers in this Course:

Natalie Rogers
Dr. Joshua Broderick
Dr. Marios Panayi

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1023.html

PSYC1024 Anxiety, Mood and Stress

The course provides a comprehensive understanding of several of the most common mental disorders, including the mood and anxiety disorders, from a clinical psychology perspective. The aim is to link basic psychological research (including animal and human studies) to the understanding of these major disorders, emphasising a scientific approach to the understanding of clinical psychology and psychology more generally. The course focuses on the role of environmental stress factors in the aetiology of these disorders. The course also examines several practical strategies for managing stress.

Lecturers in this Course:

Helena Pacitti
Dr Joshua Broderick

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1024.html

PSYC1025 Psychology of Work

How can knowledge of psychology help you to be a better manager, employee or employer? This course examines the ways that industrial and organisational psychology is applied in the workplace. The course examines research methods used to improve employee well-being and organisational productivity in areas such as recruitment and selection, training, leadership, motivating employees, managing performance, and job analysis.

Lecturers in this Course:

Dr Karen Whittingham
Dr Adam Bove

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1025.html

PSYC1027 Forensic Psychology: Crime, Courts and Corrections

This course provides an introduction to forensic psychology - the application of psychological knowledge to issues related to the legal system. The course follows an offender through the criminal justice system, from the offence and pre-trial right through to court, conviction, punishment, sentencing, and finally to treatment and release. Some of the topics covered include:

  • theories of offending, punishment, eyewitness memory, mental health assessments; 
  • expert evidence; jury decision making; 
  • the effectiveness of treatment programs for offenders; 
  • mental illness and offending; and, 
  • the rehabilitation of offenders.

Students will conduct a court observation, where they will get first-hand experience of the criminal justice system in action. On completion of the course students will have an appreciation of some of the ways psychologists interact with and can contribute to the criminal justice system.

Lecturers in this Course

A/Prof Richard Kemp
Dr Kristy Martire
Anita McGregor 
Kevin O’Sullivan

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1027.html

PSYC1031: Psychological Science of Resilience

This course is structured around the graduate attributes associated with the scientist-practitioner model, which is the basis for the training of psychologists in Australia and internationally.

The rationale for this course is that resilience skills constitute a type of graduate capability, which should not only help students survive the stressors of university life, but help them thrive in all aspects of their personal and professional lives at university and beyond.

This course is designed to enhance the psychological literacy (www.psychologicalliteracy.com) of students, in particular, the capacity to utilise psychological knowledge, skills and attitudes about resilience in a constructive manner. In this way, students should be able to use these skills not only to help themselves but also to respond to others, thus creating a “resilience ripple effect”, and helping to “give psychology away” to society at large.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Sue Morris
A/Prof Jacquelyn Cranney

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC1031.html

 

THIRD YEAR ELECTIVE STREAM A:

PSYC 3051 Physiological Psychology

This course deals with elementary learning processes and their neurobiological substrates. Included in the course:

  • an overview of the role of appetitive and aversive motivation in learning, behaviour and psychopathology,
  • learning about relations between stimuli (e.g., Pavlovian conditioning); 
  • learning about relations between actions and outcomes (e.g., instrumental conditioning); 
  • how goals are represented and how they drive behaviour; and
  • the development of habitual and compulsive behaviours.

There is also a laboratory component to this course. The primary goal of the laboratory component is to provide “hands on” experience in various aspects of research in physiological psychology.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof Gavan McNally
Prof Simon Killcross
Dr Kelly Clemens
Prof Fred Westbrook

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3051.html

PSYC 3211 Cognitive Science

This course will provide an advanced-level understanding of the current theories, methods and controversies in three key areas of cognitive psychology:

  • Intelligence and thinking – What is intelligence? Do different genders or people from different cultures differ in intelligence? What does it mean to be an expert? Why are experts better at solving problems than novices?
  • Judgment and decision-making - What is a decision? What makes a decision good or bad? Are we risk averse and if so what does that mean? 
  • Categorisation and reasoning - examines how and why people organise things in their physical and social environment into groups and how they use such knowledge to reason and make predictions.

Lecturers in this Course

Professor Ben Newell
A/Prof Mike Le Pelley
Professor Brett Hayes

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3211.html

PSYC 3221 Vision and Brain

“Attempts to construct computer models for the recognition and interpretation of arbitrary scenes have resulted in such poor performance, limited range of abilities and inflexibility that, were it not for the human existence proof, we may have been tempted long ago to conclude that high performance, general purpose vision is impossible.” (Barrow & Tannenbaum, 1971)
Although written over 40 years ago, the above statement is still pertinent and relevant today: while seemingly effortless, human visual perception is a complex achievement taking up 40% of the entire cortex. In this course, the problem of visual processing is considered from ecological, physiological, philosophical, and computational perspectives. The general orientation of the course is a theoretical one but applied aspects such as the role of basic perceptual processes in disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, and the implications for the design of effective visual displays is discussed as well.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof Colin Clifford
Dr Damien Mannion
A/Prof Branka Spehar

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3221.html

PSYC 3241 Phsychobiology of Memory and Motivation

This course examines research and theory on memory and motivation as they underpin adaptive behaviour. The focus is primarily on animal research but the application of this work to the understanding of memory and motivation in humans is made explicit. For example, the implications of this work for our understanding of memory disorders in humans, and the origin and treatment of clinical disorders is discussed.

Lecturers in this Course

Professor Rick Richardson
Dr Bronwyn Graham
Dr Kathryn Baker

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3241.html

PSYC 3311 Language and Cognition

Much of the information that we, as human beings, make use of is verbal in nature. This course will examine how we cognitively represent and access verbal information when producing, comprehending, and remembering language. All levels of language are considered ranging from the smallest sounds up to full discourse within context. The neuropsychology of language and its dysfunction is also covered, while issues related to verbal development will emerge throughout the course.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof Marcus Taft
Prof Skye McDonald

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3311.html

PSYC 3371 Multivariate Analysis

This course deals with multiple regression analysis (MRA), principal components analysis (PCA) , factor analysis (FA) and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Each of these is a form of multivariate analysis: MRA allows for correlated independent variables, and therefore provides the basis for a general data‐analytic system; PCA and FA make use of correlations to account for the structure of relationships within a set of variables; and MANOVA extends the application of ANOVA models to multivariate data and within‐subjects designs. Much of the research carried out by honours students in fourth year requires the analysis of multivariate data from experimental and non‐experimental designs.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Melanie Gleitzman

UNSW Handbookhttp://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3371.html

 

THIRD YEAR ELECTIVE STREAM B:

PSYC 3121 Social Psychology

This course provides a review of the history, principles, methods, and ethics of social psychology at an advanced level. Substantive research areas such as the nature of attraction, stereotypes and prejudice, aggression, morality and prosocial behaviour, among others, is covered.

Students will develop skills to critically evaluate research in the field of social psychology, with emphasis being placed on contemporary theories and approaches.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Lisa Williams
A/Prof Tom Denson 
Nicholas Levy 
Prof Joseph Forgas

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3121.html

PSYC 3141 Behaviour in Organisations

This course acquaints students with the research, theory, and practicalities of producing a good fit between people and their workplaces. Among other things, the course covers worker motivation, satisfaction, selection, training, leadership, teamwork, and workplace design. Students also gain an awareness of common research and practical techniques used in industrial/organisational psychology. The course provides a foundation for students wishing to pursue postgraduate studies in industrial/organisational psychology.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof James Kehoe

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3141.html

PSYC 3301 Psychology and Law

This course provides a broad overview to the discipline of psychology and law. Students are introduced to a wide range of topics in forensic psychology, covering both criminal and civil law. Topics include jury decision making, eyewitness memory, criminal profiling, children and the courts, victims and offenders, policing, and the treatment and rehabilitation of offenders. The course draws on cognitive, social and clinical psychological research. The goal is to demonstrate how psychological research can help us to understand and reform all aspects of the legal process.

This course offers a useful foundation for students interested in further study of forensic psychology at the Masters, Doctoral or PhD level.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof Richard Kemp
Dr Kristy Martire
Kevin O’Sullivan

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3301.html

PSYC 3331 Health Psychology

This course introduces students to some of the major theoretical and empirical work in Health Psychology. Its primary focus is on the promotion and maintenance of health-related behaviour and the prevention of illness. The course begins with a brief overview of the history of the field of health psychology, as well as basic models of health behaviour. The application of that knowledge then covers health promotion strategies and methods (for example, improving diet-related behaviour and attitudes, initiating and maintaining exercise programs), and disease prevention skills and behaviours (for example, coronary heart disease, cancer, and smoking-related problems).

Lecturers in this Course

Kate Faasse
Belinda Liddell
Jill Newby

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3331.html

PSYC 3341 Developmental Psychology

This course deals with the scientific study of developmental change in human behaviour and thought. The main emphasis is on development over the early part of the lifespan (infancy and childhood) but the course also examines adolescence and late adulthood. The course reviews current methods, findings and theories relating to developmental change in a number of key areas of cognition, perception, language, social interaction and emotion. Emphasis is placed on contemporary theories and approaches, and recent discoveries in the field. The clinical, educational and forensic implications of these discoveries are examined.

Lecturers in this Course

Prof Brett Hayes
Dr Jenny Richmond
A/Prof Branka Spehar

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3341.html

PSYC 3361 Psychology Research Internship

This course introduces students to empirical research in a particular sub-field of psychology. Students undertake a supervised research project, during which time they gain advanced disciplinary knowledge, learn specialized research methodologies and analysis techniques, and develop critical thinking and scientific communication skills.

Lecturers in this Course

Dr Jenny Richmond
Dr Damien Mannion
Dr Tom Beesley
A/Prof Lenny Vartanian
Caitlin Cowan

UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/current/PSYC3361.html

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